Are Your Workouts Giving You What You Want?

Are Your Workouts Giving You What You Want?

How much thought have you put into the exercises you’re going to use for your next workout?
Did you choose them yourself, or did you find them on the internet or in a magazine? What’s
your workout designed for? Do those goals match yours? Are the exercises even safe for you?
Using the wrong program can lead to wasting time in the gym, frustration, plateaus in progress
and injury. Let’s take a closer look at what goes into program design and the cost of getting it
wrong.

Exercise Selection
There are many things to think about when choosing specific exercises. Machine vs. free
weights, isolation vs. compound lifts, number of reps and sets, etc. Each one of these factors
affects the results, so making the wrong choices could lead to wasting time working on the
wrong things, limit your results or lead to injury.

Technique
If you choose the right exercises, but don’t know how to do them properly you will again limit
your results, or worse, end up injured. Poor technique leads to inefficient movement and limits
the power your muscles can create. It also changes the load on your muscles, joints, and
ligaments which can lead to pain and injury.

Volume
Volume is a way of thinking about how much work you’re doing during a workout. Doing a few
reps with a heavy weight or a lot of reps with a light weight could end up being the same
volume. Same goes for running a shorter distance quickly uphill vs a longer run at a slower pace
on flat terrain. If your volume is too great you won’t recover well between workouts and create
the possibility of injury. Too little volume and you won’t see results.

Progression
If you’ve been doing the same exercises with the same weight and the same number of reps
and sets, you’re not progressing. Same goes if you jump on the treadmill for the same amount
of time with the same settings each time. To make progress, things have to change and the
program that works for your first 6 months won’t work for you 2 years down the road.

Designing an exercise program is a complex challenge with a lot of factors to consider. Most
people have a history of injuries and don’t have perfect movement in every joint which further
complicates things. If you’re not making progress or just want to make sure your workouts are
as effective as they can be, have your physical therapist take a look at your program. Your PT
can help design an individualized program to help you reach your goals while keeping you safe
and injury free.

Your Physical Therapist Can Help You Keep Your Resolution

Your Physical Therapist Can Help You Keep Your Resolution

As one year comes to a close and another begins, people begin to set goals and make
resolutions. Losing weight, getting to the gym more often or getting into “better shape” are all
common. These all require increasing your amount of physical activity. More activity is great for
your health, energy levels, sleep, and mood. However, ramping up your activity level too quickly
after a holiday season of eating, drinking and being merry can lead to pain, injury and
disappointment if your body isn’t ready for it.

Your physical therapist is an expert in human movement, and can help you safely reach your
fitness goals. People think of PTs as the person to see after an injury, but a visit before you
change your activity level could prevent injury in the first place. An evaluation by your PT will
include assessment of your strength, range of motion, and functional movement patterns – think
jumping, running, squatting, carrying. Some PTs even like to use a standardized assessment,
such as the Functional Movement Screen.

Most common injuries from new fitness routines are caused by underlying weakness, range of
motion deficits, or compensatory movement patterns. Your PT will find these during your
assessment. They can then prescribe exercises or movements to address the issues found and
get you safely moving into the new year!

The other common way people get injured working towards their resolution is with overtraining,
or doing too much too soon. Physical therapists are also experts in exercise prescription and
program design. Your PT can help you create a routine specific to your needs and goals that will
progress appropriately and keep you out of trouble.

So stop only thinking of your PT after you’re injured. In this case, it’s true that an ounce of
prevention is worth a pound of cure. Seeing your physical therapist before you start on your
resolution can keep you on track, injury free, and help you reach your goals for the new year!

Start Your Year With an Annual Movement Screen

Start Your Year With an Annual Movement Screen

Your car needs regular maintenance, so you probably have a mechanic. Your eyes and teeth
are important, so you see your optometrist and dentist regularly. You get an annual physical
from your family physician. You might even be getting ready to see your accountant to get your
yearly income tax done. What about your physical therapist? Do you and your family have one?
If not, you should. Your body is a lot like your car. It’s got multiple systems, all of which are
complex, and all of which have to be working well for it to function. Physical therapists are
experts in maintaining, diagnosing, and treating the movement system. Like the braking or
ignition system in a car, most people only think of the movement system when it’s not working
the way it should.

Don’t Neglect Your Movement System

Similar to the systems in your car, problems with your movement system are much easier to
deal with if they’re caught and treated early. This prevents small issues from becoming larger
ones. For example, if you have a little bit of weakness, and balance that’s not quite up to par,
improving those early could prevent a sprained ankle, or a fall and a broken wrist.
An annual movement screen from your physical therapist can find small issues that you may not
have noticed with your strength, balance, flexibility, or coordination. Many of these minor issues
can be fixed with a few exercises at home, or with just a few visits.
What to Expect
A screen of your movement system is quick and easy. Your annual visit may include:
● A history of your injuries, as well as a health history
● Assessment of your strength, balance, flexibility, etc.
● A review of your movement goals (do you want to run a marathon? Get on and off the
floor easily playing with your grandkids?)
● A review and update of your exercise program

What’s a Movement Diagnosis?

Medical diagnoses don’t need much of an introduction. They’re what you get from your doctor
when you’re sick. Examples would be influenza, diabetes, or hypertension. They describe the
underlying problem that is causing your symptoms.

When people feel sick, they know they need to go to the doctor and find out what’s going on to
get treated. We should treat movement the same way. If you’re having pain when you move,
can’t do things you used to be able to – like get on and off the floor easily, or can’t do things you
want to do – like go for a bike ride or pick up a grandchild then you need to get a movement
diagnosis.

A movement diagnosis does the same thing as a medical diagnosis; it describes what’s causing
your difficulty with movement. Some examples would be difficulty standing from a chair
secondary to decreased force production, scapular down rotation syndrome, or lower crossed
syndrome.

Diagnoses set the roadmap for treatment, so getting them right is crucial. Human movement is
complex and is influenced by more than just your muscles and joints. According to the APTA,
movement is impacted by the following systems:
● Endocrine
● Nervous
● Cardiovascular
● Pulmonary
● Integumentary
● Musculoskeletal

Because of the complexity and interplay between these components of the movement system,
getting a movement diagnosis correct is often very difficult. Physical therapists are experts in
human movement with doctoral level training and should be your first stop for movement issues.
Not only can a physical therapist provide an accurate movement diagnosis, they will also design
a treatment plan to correct the underlying issues and help get you moving well again.

References:
https://www.neuropt.org/docs/default-source/default-document-library/movement-systemdiagnosis-in-neurologic-physical-therapy-where-are-we.pdf?sfvrsn=0
https://journals.lww.com/jnpt/FullText/2018/04000/White_Paper__Movement_System_Diagnose
s_in.9.aspx
https://www.apta.org/MovementSystem/
https://www.apta.org/MovementSystem/Template/

Life is a Movement Journey, Here’s How PT Can Help

Now that spring has arrived, temperatures are starting to rise in many parts of the country. And
that means the transition from heating our homes to cooling our homes is right around the
corner. No matter what method you use to cool your home during the warm spring and summer
months (central air conditioning, window units, or fans and dehumidifiers), each spring you cross
your fingers that your approach still works. If not, you might be calling an expert for a tune-up,
or in extreme circumstances, you might need a complete overhaul.

Just like an AC system that has probably been dormant for many months of the year, a body
that hasn’t been physically engaged on a regular basis may have trouble getting started again.
And yet, this time of year, the warm temps draw many people to city and suburban streets,
tracks and trails, ready to take that first run of the season. A good percentage of these spring
runners haven’t kept up their strides throughout the winter. It should come as no surprise that a
4-mile run for a previously inactive person is going to stir up a few aches and pains.

Especially as we age, our ability to move undergoes changes. But whether we’re talking about a
college student or a retiree, returning to an activity without proper planning is a recipe for
disaster. That’s where physical therapy comes in. Physical therapists are trained to treat injuries
and ease pain, but they can also help their patients prevent injuries and safely prepare to
participate in new activities.

Think of physical therapists as “movement consultants” who can ensure that your body is
physically ready to tackle a new challenge—or resume a favorite leisure activity. Here’s another
example to illustrate what we’re talking about: Let’s say that you play in an adult soccer league
and you’re preparing to play in your first game of the season in a few weeks. You probably hung
up your cleats when the last season ended months ago, but expect to pick up just where you left
off. But it’s simply too much to ask for your 2019 debut on the field to be on the same level as
the last game of the previous season, when you likely had reached peak performance.

This is a good time for your PT to step in and help you shake off the rust. The rehab professional
can customize an exercise plan to help you slowly return to sport and avoid an injury that could
sideline you for the whole season. Or like cleaning the filters before firing up your air
conditioner for the first time this year, the rehab expert can help to ensure that your body is
prepared to return to its former activity level following a hiatus

Life is a Movement Journey, Here’s How PT Can Help

Now that spring has arrived, temperatures are starting to rise in many parts of the country. And
that means the transition from heating our homes to cooling our homes is right around the
corner. No matter what method you use to cool your home during the warm spring and summer
months (central air conditioning, window units, or fans and dehumidifiers), each spring you cross
your fingers that your approach still works. If not, you might be calling an expert for a tune-up,
or in extreme circumstances, you might need a complete overhaul.

Just like an AC system that has probably been dormant for many months of the year, a body
that hasn’t been physically engaged on a regular basis may have trouble getting started again.
And yet, this time of year, the warm temps draw many people to city and suburban streets,
tracks and trails, ready to take that first run of the season. A good percentage of these spring
runners haven’t kept up their strides throughout the winter. It should come as no surprise that a
4-mile run for a previously inactive person is going to stir up a few aches and pains.

Especially as we age, our ability to move undergoes changes. But whether we’re talking about a
college student or a retiree, returning to an activity without proper planning is a recipe for
disaster. That’s where physical therapy comes in. Physical therapists are trained to treat injuries
and ease pain, but they can also help their patients prevent injuries and safely prepare to
participate in new activities.

Think of physical therapists as “movement consultants” who can ensure that your body is
physically ready to tackle a new challenge—or resume a favorite leisure activity. Here’s another
example to illustrate what we’re talking about: Let’s say that you play in an adult soccer league
and you’re preparing to play in your first game of the season in a few weeks. You probably hung
up your cleats when the last season ended months ago, but expect to pick up just where you left
off. But it’s simply too much to ask for your 2019 debut on the field to be on the same level as
the last game of the previous season, when you likely had reached peak performance.

This is a good time for your PT to step in and help you shake off the rust. The rehab professional
can customize an exercise plan to help you slowly return to sport and avoid an injury that could
sideline you for the whole season. Or like cleaning the filters before firing up your air
conditioner for the first time this year, the rehab expert can help to ensure that your body is
prepared to return to its former activity level following a hiatus.

Ask a Physical Therapist To “Screen” Your Movements This Spring

Let’s talk about the last time you—or someone close to you—interviewed for a new job. Chances are that the first step was a phone screen with your potential employer, and when you passed that portion of the process with flying colors, you were then invited for an in-person interview. At that stage, the employer probably asked you to answer a series of questions and to demonstrate your skills through a test or two. The process is set up in a way that narrows down the options until the most suitable candidate is found. Makes sense, right?

Just as job recruiters screen applicants to find the best fit for
an open position, your PT will ask you to perform a series of exercises so that she can observe and understand your body
mechanics to uncover any issues or limitations. Used in combination with a full evaluation and assessment, these so-called movement screens are just one tool in identifying the most appropriate treatment or prevention program for you. But unlike that test you may have taken during a job interview, the screen is not testing your skills or abilities, it’s simply a way of identifying how your body functions during a variety of movements.

Now that spring is in full swing, it’s the perfect time of year to make an appointment with a physical therapist for a movement screen. The warmer weather means more time spent outdoors participating in sports and other recreational activities that may be physically demanding. A PT checkup that includes a movement screen will ensure that you’re physically able to engage in popular spring and summer adventures, whether it’s exploring in the woods, tending to your garden, or swimming at your family’s lake house.

Physical therapists perform movement screens for a variety of reasons, including:
• To identify areas of strength and weakness
• To uncover issues or rule them out
• To determine readiness to begin a safe exercise program
• To improve sport performance (for both novice and elite athletes)

A movement screen is something that you can have done whether you have a nagging injury or are simply ready to kick-start your activity level after a long hiatus. Gaining
an understanding of how your body performs during basic exercises such as squats and lunges helps your PT ensure that you can safely jump on a bike or into a pool this summer. And just like an employer screens candidates to identify the one individual who is likely to thrive on the job for many years to come, a movement screen can help you
develop a lasting and fulfilling relationship with the activities you enjoy most.

Call us today to schedule your FREE screening!